Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Why Stash?

This will be short and hopefully what I am going to say is not something you have heard before.

There are many reasons why knitters stash yarn. Some revel in it while others dread the stash and work to cull it down only to find themselves helpless in front of some lace weight merino-silk blend. As for me, I stash because I like how it looks in my room. My stash is on a book shelf right next to my bed so I get to see it every single morning. It gives me much joy and pleasure being able to be lulled asleep by the stash and quickly rejuvenated by it the next morning.

Today at the job, I came up with another reason I, and probably you too, should stash. Let's face it. The popularity of knitting is fading. And if it hasn't yet, it sure will pretty soon. That means that the market for the knitting industry will dry up and not be as hot as it once was. Therefore, all the cool fibers that have been coming out lately like bamboo, seacell, and soysilk will be the first to go. Then the more traditional materials will become less available like silk, cashmere, and alpaca. If there is not a market of knitters clamoring for beautiful yarn made for hand knitting, then yarn producers will go out of business. Places like Blue Moon Fiber Arts, Cascade, and smaller hand dying operations will cease to exist. And all of those knitters who are now obsessed with stash busting will be left with nothing but lint and scraps to knit with. Oh how they will regret their present day actions in the future!

In short, in order to keep the current yarns we have available to the knitting community, consumers must continue buying. As long as someone can make money and fill a gap in the market, then we knitter's will have what we want. But realistically, 10 years from now, the knitting industry could revert back to the days of the 70's of Kevlar acrylic and itchy as all hell wools. Mind you, I was born in 1984 but I have heard the horror stories and do NOT wish to return to the "good ol' days." God forbid when that day comes, your left with only a couple skeins of hand dyed sock yarn to last you for 2 months. You WANT to be prepared for the day when fiber artisans and hand knitting producers finally shut down shop by the thousands. When your source for high quality wool ceases to exist, you don't want to be left high and dry without any yarn.

So my advice? Buy within your means and remember that if you don't buy yarn, businesses will loose revenue and eventually go out of business. Always remember that the party will have to end at some point. The stuff you covet now will be gone tomorrow. Nothing lasts forever, therefore BE PREPARED FOR THE END!!!

Don't I sound like a religious fanatic? What do you think?

6 comments:

noblinknits said...

Ok so it's our duty to shop? We might reach peak yarn? I like it!

trek said...

Erm, are you stockpiling canned goods and powdered milk, too? ;o)

trek said...

Kelly, I got your comment about the yarn prize (oh, yay!!!!) but not your email address. oops.

Hope you catch my email with this comment.

del said...

Do you really think it'll get that bad? Man, I hope not! It seems like the knitters who do remain devoted to the craft are certainly keeping the yarn market afloat.

Angelita said...

vaya, suena algo apocaliptico tu mensaje, pero si seguimos comprando e incentibando el arte del tejido a mano creo que estaremos lejos de llegar a ese final...

Linda said...

I hope that Angelita is correct, because apocalíptico sure applies to your 'yarn futures' message! If I could afford to continue buying...and had more SPACE to display (aesthetically, mind you!) the oodles of yarn that I covet, I'd be happily doing my part to avert impending doom.